Before the Flood (2016)

Director
Fisher Stevens

Main cast
Bill Clinton; John Kerry; Barack Obama; Elon Musk; Pope Francis

Genres
Documentary, TV Movie

Description
A look at how climate change affects our environment and what society can do prevent the demise of endangered species, ecosystems, and native communities across the planet.


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