The Meerkats (2008)

Director
James Honeyborne

Main cast
Paul Newman; Guillaume Canet

Genres
Documentary

Description
A coming of age story following a young meerkat pup, Kolo, growing up in the Kalahari desert; and an inspiring look at how one family's connection to each other and their surroundings is a model of resilience and fortitude for us all. Shot using ground-breaking techniques, this dramatised documentary is a one-of-a-kind presentation from The Weinstein Company and the BBC, featuring narration by Paul Newman.


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The story of a family of meerkats living in the Kalahari Desert in South Africa.
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