Wal-Mart: The High Cost of Low Price (2005)

Director
Robert Greenwald

Main cast
Lee Scott; Don Hunter; Jon Hunter; Jeremy Hunter; Matt Hunter

Genres
Documentary

Description
This documentary takes the viewer on a deeply personal journey into the everyday lives of families struggling to fight Goliath. From a family business owner in the Midwest to a preacher in California, from workers in Florida to a poet in Mexico, dozens of film crews on three continents bring the intensely personal stories of an assault on families and American values.


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