Meeting People Is Easy (1998)

Director
Grant Gee

Main cast
Thom Yorke; Phil Selway; Jonny Greenwood; Ed O'Brien; Colin Greenwood

Genres
Music, Documentary

Description
Meeting People Is Easy takes place during the promotion of Radiohead's 1997 release OK Computer, containing a collage of video clips, sound bites, and dialogue going behind the scenes with the band on their world tour, showing the eventual burn-out of the group as the world tour progresses. The inaugural show of the OK Computer tour began on 22 May 1997 in Barcelona, Spain.


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