Can Heironymus Merkin Ever Forget Mercy Humppe and Find True Happiness? (1969)

Director
Anthony Newley

Main cast
Anthony Newley; Joan Collins; Alexander Newley; Tara Newley; Milton Berle

Genres
Comedy

Description
Heironymus Merkin screens an autobiographical movie of his life, growth and moral decay.


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